A Thousand Winds
 A Neopolitan Saint Manufactory, 1832, oil on canvas by Thomas Uwins, British, 1782-1857. Leicester Arts and Museums Service, Leicester, England.
  This painting was made for Jonathan Hatfield, a wealthy merchant. It shows two Capuchin friars of the Franciscan Order, bargaining for two cherubs suspended from the ceiling at the top left.   

 A Neopolitan Saint Manufactory, 1832, oil on canvas by Thomas Uwins, British, 1782-1857. Leicester Arts and Museums Service, Leicester, England.

  This painting was made for Jonathan Hatfield, a wealthy merchant. It shows two Capuchin friars of the Franciscan Order, bargaining for two cherubs suspended from the ceiling at the top left.   

 The Entry Into London of Richard II and Bolingbroke in 1399, oil on panel by James Taylor Edlington, British, 1813-1868. Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool, Liverpool, England.

 The Entry Into London of Richard II and Bolingbroke in 1399, oil on panel by James Taylor Edlington, British, 1813-1868. Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool, Liverpool, England.

 Sloth and Work, 1863, oil on canvas by Michele Cammarano, Italian, 1835-1920. Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples, Italy.
 Cammarano highlights the value of work over laziness in one of his first paintings concerned with social problems. Cammarano was from a family of artists and experimented with a variety of styles. He later became a professor at the Institute of Fine Art in Naples, Italy.

 Sloth and Work, 1863, oil on canvas by Michele Cammarano, Italian, 1835-1920. Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples, Italy.

 Cammarano highlights the value of work over laziness in one of his first paintings concerned with social problems. Cammarano was from a family of artists and experimented with a variety of styles. He later became a professor at the Institute of Fine Art in Naples, Italy.

oldbookillustrations:

View in Edward the Confessor’s chapel.
John Preston Neale, from The history and antiquities of the abbey church of St. Peter, Westminster vol. 2, by Edward Wedlake Brayley, London, 1818.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

View in Edward the Confessor’s chapel.

John Preston Neale, from The history and antiquities of the abbey church of St. Peter, Westminster vol. 2, by Edward Wedlake Brayley, London, 1818.

(Source: archive.org)

  Small Town at Dusk, oil on wood by Aert van der Neer, Dutch Baroque artist, 1603/04-1677. Szépmûvészeti Múzeum, Budapest Hungary.
   van der Neer’s strength was in his dusk and nocturnal scenes where dim light could reflect on water and in windows in some of his village scenes.  

  Small Town at Dusk, oil on wood by Aert van der Neer, Dutch Baroque artist, 1603/04-1677. Szépmûvészeti Múzeum, Budapest Hungary.

   van der Neer’s strength was in his dusk and nocturnal scenes where dim light could reflect on water and in windows in some of his village scenes.  

 Dunsky Castle, 1816, aquatint by William Daniell for his Voyage Round Great Britain.
 Daniell, 1769-1837, was a British painter and engraver who specialized in landscapes and marine scenes. His work is represented in England, The United States and Wales.
  Dunsky Castle sits on a promontory near Port Patrick in Wigtonshire, Scotland. It was already in ruins by the 17th century, but a great part of it remained. 
  A total of 306 of the 308 original Daniell copper plates were found in 1962 after being lost for 100 years. They are now the property of the Tate in London.

 Dunsky Castle, 1816, aquatint by William Daniell for his Voyage Round Great Britain.

 Daniell, 1769-1837, was a British painter and engraver who specialized in landscapes and marine scenes. His work is represented in England, The United States and Wales.

  Dunsky Castle sits on a promontory near Port Patrick in Wigtonshire, Scotland. It was already in ruins by the 17th century, but a great part of it remained. 

  A total of 306 of the 308 original Daniell copper plates were found in 1962 after being lost for 100 years. They are now the property of the Tate in London.

  Breakfast, 1887, oil on canvas by Swedish impressionist artist Hanna Pauli, 1864-1940. Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden.
   A warm and inviting scene, it was perhaps inspired by Monet’s The Luncheon. Monet’s feast was over while this is just beginning.
  Having studied in Sweden, Pauli was a genre, landscape and portrait artist who studied the plein-air technique in France.

  Breakfast, 1887, oil on canvas by Swedish impressionist artist Hanna Pauli, 1864-1940. Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden.

   A warm and inviting scene, it was perhaps inspired by Monet’s The Luncheon. Monet’s feast was over while this is just beginning.

  Having studied in Sweden, Pauli was a genre, landscape and portrait artist who studied the plein-air technique in France.

 Rainy Day, France, oil on canvas by Ulpiano Checa, Spanish, 1860-1916.
 Checa was a sculptor, designer and illustrator. He painted in the impressionistic and academic styles and often created historic scenes.

 Rainy Day, France, oil on canvas by Ulpiano Checa, Spanish, 1860-1916.

 Checa was a sculptor, designer and illustrator. He painted in the impressionistic and academic styles and often created historic scenes.

  Autumn, 1875, oil on canvas by Fredric Edwin Church, American, 1826-1900. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain.
  Light does not fall obliquely in this scene, but bursts from the center, showing the radiance of the fall color and adding drama to the scene.
   A landscape painter, Church continued the Hudson River School tradition. He was popular in his day and, after being forgotten for years, has enjoyed a return to favor.  His home on the Hudson River in New York is a museum.

  Autumn, 1875, oil on canvas by Fredric Edwin Church, American, 1826-1900. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain.

  Light does not fall obliquely in this scene, but bursts from the center, showing the radiance of the fall color and adding drama to the scene.

   A landscape painter, Church continued the Hudson River School tradition. He was popular in his day and, after being forgotten for years, has enjoyed a return to favor.  His home on the Hudson River in New York is a museum.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Johan Christian Dahl painted the aptly titled View of Dresden by Moonlight in 1839.
According to the Metropolitan Museum, “Johan Christian Dahl was [Caspar David] Friedrich’s friend and upstairs neighbor in Dresden from 1823 on…Dahl adopted from Friedrich the mysterious, mood-enhancing effects of dusk, fog, moon, and twilight.”
That suggests, though, a more dramatic scene than View of Dresden.
True, there’s an element of mystery in the bright, but partially obscured, moon—especially in contrast to the red-orange glow of the illuminated windows on the far bank and the fires on the near—but the scene is unusually matter-of-fact.
A close look, for example, at the domed building in the distance reveals precise and neatly delineated architectural details: the antithesis of enigma. The women hanging laundry in the near left corner adds to the prosaic effect.
Yet the very concessions Dahl makes to concreteness also makes the scene as compelling as it is. The disunity of color between the sky and the iced-over river, at first perhaps seeming to reflect a disappointing unwillingness to idealize, produces conflict in an otherwise largely uniform piece.
And there is a sort of pathos—given the temperature that the ice and the hour imply—in the comparison of the washerwomen, elbow-deep in damp laundry, to the buildings across the river, which glow with warmth, and occupants.
(Note: Dahl, 1788-1857, was born in Norway .— athousandwinds)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Johan Christian Dahl painted the aptly titled View of Dresden by Moonlight in 1839.

According to the Metropolitan Museum, “Johan Christian Dahl was [Caspar David] Friedrich’s friend and upstairs neighbor in Dresden from 1823 on…Dahl adopted from Friedrich the mysterious, mood-enhancing effects of dusk, fog, moon, and twilight.”

That suggests, though, a more dramatic scene than View of Dresden.

True, there’s an element of mystery in the bright, but partially obscured, moon—especially in contrast to the red-orange glow of the illuminated windows on the far bank and the fires on the near—but the scene is unusually matter-of-fact.

A close look, for example, at the domed building in the distance reveals precise and neatly delineated architectural details: the antithesis of enigma. The women hanging laundry in the near left corner adds to the prosaic effect.

Yet the very concessions Dahl makes to concreteness also makes the scene as compelling as it is. The disunity of color between the sky and the iced-over river, at first perhaps seeming to reflect a disappointing unwillingness to idealize, produces conflict in an otherwise largely uniform piece.

And there is a sort of pathos—given the temperature that the ice and the hour imply—in the comparison of the washerwomen, elbow-deep in damp laundry, to the buildings across the river, which glow with warmth, and occupants.

(Note: Dahl, 1788-1857, was born in Norway .— athousandwinds)