A Thousand Winds
  Breakfast, 1887, oil on canvas by Swedish impressionist artist Hanna Pauli, 1864-1940. Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden.
   A warm and inviting scene, it was perhaps inspired by Monet’s The Luncheon. Monet’s feast was over while this is just beginning.
  Having studied in Sweden, Pauli was a genre, landscape and portrait artist who studied the plein-air technique in France.

  Breakfast, 1887, oil on canvas by Swedish impressionist artist Hanna Pauli, 1864-1940. Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden.

   A warm and inviting scene, it was perhaps inspired by Monet’s The Luncheon. Monet’s feast was over while this is just beginning.

  Having studied in Sweden, Pauli was a genre, landscape and portrait artist who studied the plein-air technique in France.

 Rainy Day, France, oil on canvas by Ulpiano Checa, Spanish, 1860-1916.
 Checa was a sculptor, designer and illustrator. He painted in the impressionistic and academic styles and often created historic scenes.

 Rainy Day, France, oil on canvas by Ulpiano Checa, Spanish, 1860-1916.

 Checa was a sculptor, designer and illustrator. He painted in the impressionistic and academic styles and often created historic scenes.

  Autumn, 1875, oil on canvas by Fredric Edwin Church, American, 1826-1900. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain.
  Light does not fall obliquely in this scene, but bursts from the center, showing the radiance of the fall color and adding drama to the scene.
   A landscape painter, Church continued the Hudson River School tradition. He was popular in his day and, after being forgotten for years, has enjoyed a return to favor.  His home on the Hudson River in New York is a museum.

  Autumn, 1875, oil on canvas by Fredric Edwin Church, American, 1826-1900. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain.

  Light does not fall obliquely in this scene, but bursts from the center, showing the radiance of the fall color and adding drama to the scene.

   A landscape painter, Church continued the Hudson River School tradition. He was popular in his day and, after being forgotten for years, has enjoyed a return to favor.  His home on the Hudson River in New York is a museum.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Johan Christian Dahl painted the aptly titled View of Dresden by Moonlight in 1839.
According to the Metropolitan Museum, “Johan Christian Dahl was [Caspar David] Friedrich’s friend and upstairs neighbor in Dresden from 1823 on…Dahl adopted from Friedrich the mysterious, mood-enhancing effects of dusk, fog, moon, and twilight.”
That suggests, though, a more dramatic scene than View of Dresden.
True, there’s an element of mystery in the bright, but partially obscured, moon—especially in contrast to the red-orange glow of the illuminated windows on the far bank and the fires on the near—but the scene is unusually matter-of-fact.
A close look, for example, at the domed building in the distance reveals precise and neatly delineated architectural details: the antithesis of enigma. The women hanging laundry in the near left corner adds to the prosaic effect.
Yet the very concessions Dahl makes to concreteness also makes the scene as compelling as it is. The disunity of color between the sky and the iced-over river, at first perhaps seeming to reflect a disappointing unwillingness to idealize, produces conflict in an otherwise largely uniform piece.
And there is a sort of pathos—given the temperature that the ice and the hour imply—in the comparison of the washerwomen, elbow-deep in damp laundry, to the buildings across the river, which glow with warmth, and occupants.
(Note: Dahl, 1788-1857, was born in Norway .— athousandwinds)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Johan Christian Dahl painted the aptly titled View of Dresden by Moonlight in 1839.

According to the Metropolitan Museum, “Johan Christian Dahl was [Caspar David] Friedrich’s friend and upstairs neighbor in Dresden from 1823 on…Dahl adopted from Friedrich the mysterious, mood-enhancing effects of dusk, fog, moon, and twilight.”

That suggests, though, a more dramatic scene than View of Dresden.

True, there’s an element of mystery in the bright, but partially obscured, moon—especially in contrast to the red-orange glow of the illuminated windows on the far bank and the fires on the near—but the scene is unusually matter-of-fact.

A close look, for example, at the domed building in the distance reveals precise and neatly delineated architectural details: the antithesis of enigma. The women hanging laundry in the near left corner adds to the prosaic effect.

Yet the very concessions Dahl makes to concreteness also makes the scene as compelling as it is. The disunity of color between the sky and the iced-over river, at first perhaps seeming to reflect a disappointing unwillingness to idealize, produces conflict in an otherwise largely uniform piece.

And there is a sort of pathos—given the temperature that the ice and the hour imply—in the comparison of the washerwomen, elbow-deep in damp laundry, to the buildings across the river, which glow with warmth, and occupants.

(Note: Dahl, 1788-1857, was born in Norway .— athousandwinds)

 Old Blackfriars Footbridge Over the River Irwell, oil on canvas by John Ralston, British, 1789-1833. Salford Museum and Art Gallery, Manchester, England.

 Old Blackfriars Footbridge Over the River Irwell, oil on canvas by John Ralston, British, 1789-1833. Salford Museum and Art Gallery, Manchester, England.

 View on the Avon at Hotwells, 1840, by Samuel Jackson, British, 1794-1869. Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, Bristol, England.
  At the lower right hand side is a boat filled with turtles and a man on the pier carries one on his head.  Jackson knew this scene well and lived close to here. He was considered the father of the Bristol School of artists. 

 View on the Avon at Hotwells, 1840, by Samuel Jackson, British, 1794-1869. Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, Bristol, England.

  At the lower right hand side is a boat filled with turtles and a man on the pier carries one on his head.  Jackson knew this scene well and lived close to here. He was considered the father of the Bristol School of artists. 

  Lighthouse at Stora Bält, 1846, oil on canvas by Anton Melbye, Dutch, 1818-1875. Statens Museum at Copenhagen, Denmark.
  Melbye was enchanted by stormy weather and the sea and did a number of marine paintings to show light and weather effects. He was also remembered for early daguerreotype photography learned from its inventor, Louis Dagerre.

  Lighthouse at Stora Bält, 1846, oil on canvas by Anton Melbye, Dutch, 1818-1875. Statens Museum at Copenhagen, Denmark.

  Melbye was enchanted by stormy weather and the sea and did a number of marine paintings to show light and weather effects. He was also remembered for early daguerreotype photography learned from its inventor, Louis Dagerre.

 Sea at Night, 1865, oil on canvas by Anton Melbye, Dutch, 1818-1875. Hermitage museum at St. Petersburg, Russia.
 Melbye was a marine artist who was influenced by Camille Carot. 

 Sea at Night, 1865, oil on canvas by Anton Melbye, Dutch, 1818-1875. Hermitage museum at St. Petersburg, Russia.

 Melbye was a marine artist who was influenced by Camille Carot

 Grove of monkey puzzle trees at Powerscourt in County Wicklow, Ireland.
  Legend has it a monkey, having climbed the tree, could never figure out how to get down as the spines on the evergreen point toward the trunk. Photograph by athousandwinds.

 Grove of monkey puzzle trees at Powerscourt in County Wicklow, Ireland.

  Legend has it a monkey, having climbed the tree, could never figure out how to get down as the spines on the evergreen point toward the trunk. Photograph by athousandwinds.

catonhottinroof:

Louis Sparre  
Toward the sun, 1908

catonhottinroof:

Louis Sparre  

Toward the sun, 1908